Adult Learners:
Enrollment of 25 to 49 Year Olds as a Percent of 25 to 49 Year Olds with No Bachelors Degree or Higher

For the Year

Enrollment of 25 to 49 Year Olds as a Percent of 25 to 49 Year Olds with No Bachelors Degree or Higher

Why is this important?

This is a primary measure of the participation rates of non-traditional students in postsecondary education. It reflects the commitment of the state and its citizens to life-long learning. In some states, their ability to achieve competitive levels of educational attainment hinges on their success in serving more adults students who did not succeed in the traditional education pipeline.

What are the policy implications?

One of the greatest benefits of a good state system of education (both secondary and postsecondary) is an educated workforce. Functional literacy skills and the availability of opportunities for older adults to train and retrain are imperative for upward mobility and to meet the needs of a changing economy.

Other factors to consider:

For This measure also is influenced, in part, by the accessibility of two-year programs. Larger proportions of non-traditional age adult students typically enroll part-time at two-year institutions.

Part-Time Undergraduate Enrollment as a Percent of 25-44 Year Olds

Percent of Total Population Enrolled in College - 18-64 Year Olds

Percent of the Population with a High School Diploma or Equivalent

Data sources and related links:

NCES, IPEDS Fall Enrollment Survey, http://sur veys.nces.ed.gov/ipeds/

2005 American Community Survey, http:// www.census.gov/acs/www/